Spring time fava and garbanzo scotch egg

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Scotch egg was absolutely one of my favorites when we lived in England. I have been thinking about making a vegetarian version of it for a while now, and asparagus season seemed to be the best time for this experiment. Because we all  know it.  Asparagus, egg and breadcrumb go hand in hand in perfect harmony. For this recipe the most important thing I had to come up with is a vegetarian sausage meat replacement. I definitely prefer using vegetables over tofu, tempeh, seitan. I picked garbanzo beans because I knew that can hold other ingredients together very well. Later I will try to make it work with lentil, just simply because lentil is my favorite legume. I paired garbanzo with fresh fava beans, since  they are in season too, and also wanted to add some of that cooked to the dish as well, to bring more brightness and freshness to the plate.

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So what are the components in the dish?

I decided to serve the scotch egg with simply blanched asparagus. Scotch egg is traditionally deep fried and crispy, so it definitely needed a clean, fresh accompaniment, that is the reason for blanching, and not roasting or pan frying the asparagus. For a creamy sauce-y component I made a fresh, vibrant asparagus tarragon sauce.

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How to blanch asparagus?         

To prep asparagus cut off woody ends and carefully peel asparagus 2/3 up. (see picture above)  Bring a big pot of water to the boil and season with salt generously. Blanching takes a few minutes, s no worries, the vegetables will not be salty. When the water is rapidly boiling, add asparagus and make sure boiling never stops! After a minute or two, depending one the freshness and thickness of your asparagus, transfer them into ice cold water. Now they are ready for any kind of dish to use. You can warm them up with butter/oil, pan roast them quickly or continue cooking for a few minutes in sauces. 

I blanched asparagus, freshly shucked English peas and fava beans. After blanching, I simply warmed them with some butter and seasoned with salt, black pepper and meyer lemon zest. Be careful if you have the urge to add lemon juice, it will quickly take away the fresh green color of your vegetables!

 To introduce my choice of herb, tarragon, to the dish I made a sauce using the asparagus scrapings that you can see in the top picture, as a base. Blanched the scrapings and tarragon is salted water, then dropped them into ice cold water to retain color. Separately sautéed white onion and let that cool and blended quickly with the blanched asparagus and tarragon. Seasoned with salt and ground black pepper. Right before plating added some meyer lemon juice to taste.

See below detailed recipe for the scotch egg, included some tips for making them. It is really up to you what you serve these scotch eggs with . They are great cold, as part of a green salad, or warm with a simple asparagus soup. Scotch eggs may not be the quickest and easiest things to make but they are worth the work.

Garbanzo and fava scotch eggs

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Ingredients (for 4 eggs)

  • 4 eggs
  • olive oil
  • 1 small brown onion, chopped finely
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced
  • 3 oz cremini mushrooms, chopped
  • 3/4 cup cooked garbanzo beans (or canned)
  • 1/2 cup fresh fava beans, cooked
  • 1/2 T chopped parsley
  • 1 t dijon mustard
  • 1/4 t Hungarian paprika
  • salt, ground black pepper to taste

For standard breading procedure and deep frying the eggs:

  • flour
  • 2 eggs and 1T water for egg wash
  • breadcrumb
  • grapeseed oil for deep-frying the eggs

 

  1. Start with cooking the eggs. Boil water in a pot. Cook eggs in simmering water for 5 and 1/2 minutes, so the yolks stay runny. If you plan to eat some of the eggs later, I recommend cooking them longer, around 8-9 minutes. Cold eggs are just better when the yolk is not runny. Once the eggs are cooked, immediately put them in ice-cold water to stop them cooking. This is very important if you want to keep nice runny yolks.
  2. In the meantime start sweating the chopped onions on olive oil. Carefully cook them until translucent, not to burn them. Add the garlic, cook for a minute and finally the chopped mushrooms. Cook until you get rid of moisture. Let it cool.
  3. Rinse cooked garbanzo beans and transfer into a food processor. Add the onion mushroom mixture, the cooked fava beans, dijon, parsley and spices. Process until it forms a paste with chunky bits.  A few tips : In case the mixture is dry, add a bit of olive oil. If you added too much oil at the beginning and feels too soft, add breadcrumb or even oatmeal. If for any reason your paste is not sticking together, add an egg and mix well. You will need to use this veggie mixture to coat the cooked eggs.
  4. Before coating the eggs with the veggie mixture, dredge the eggs in flour. This step will help the veggie mixture hang onto the egg’s surface.
  5. It is time now to coat the wobbly soft eggs in the veggie “mince”. The easiest way to do this: Place a portion of the mixture on a piece of clinging film. Cover it with another clinging film and with a rolling pin flatten it out evenly.  Take off top clinging film and lift flattened disk, wrapping it carefully around the egg and molding into the right shape. It is a delicate task if you want runny yolks and your eggs are soft. I did break an egg, so take your time. Once the eggs covered in the garbanzo mix, let them cool in the fridge. If you want to make them in advance, this is the stage where you can keep them covered in the fridge for a day.
  6. To finish off the eggs, use the standard 3 step breading procedure to coat the egg: dredge in flour, moisten in the egg wash and coat in breadcrumbs.
  7. Fill a small pot with enough oil to cover whole eggs. Deep fry the eggs in batches if your pot is not too big, so that oil will not cool down while doing deep frying, to avoid soggy coating.
  8. Serve the eggs with your choice of accompaniment, such as salad, cooked vegetables, soup, sauce.

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Sunday market brunch series

The idea was born yesterday. A series of seasonal market brunches on Sunday. And why? As much as I enjoy creating complex dishes and paint a beautiful plating with my food, just as much enjoy the simplicity, yet complexity if done well, of farmfresh food. I love coming home from the market, looking at all the beautiful produce I bought, and make something simple, yet flavorful, feeding our hunger on a weekend morning. As far as I remember weekend brunches have always been my favorite. Even before I named them brunch, back in Hungary. Waking up late, starting the day slow with a cup of coffee and feeling hungry only a bit later. So around midday we would have a big breakfast, which essentially is brunch. And now on weekends I usually go to the market and making brunch with the fresh produce just comes natural. In this series emphasis will always be on some of the produce, enhancing their flavor with simple cooking techniques and the right seasoning, herbs. Hope you like it and join me on Sundays!

Roasted beet and radish salad with beet greens and eggs

Yesterday I went to my local market here in Pasadena. I like it because of the close proximity, the beautiful backdrop of the mountains, and also the perfect selection of farms. There are some definite favorite growers of mine, which I will introduce you next week, in case you live nearby you can try their produce.

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This is what I mostly I ended up bringing home:). I say mostly, because there are other things as well, that I buy every week, such as bread, egg, goat cheese and some veggies for juicing. I buy kiwis for my husband, he really loves them, and I bought all the parsnip, apple, carrots, radish for my final project in raw vegan cooking, that I am making this coming week.

Looking at the produce I decided to make a beet salad with boiled eggs. When I saw how perfect looking the beet greens are, I knew I had to keep them. I tasted it, it was flavorful, but the bigger leaves were a little bit hard. So I decided to remove the leaves of the stalk, cut the big ones into baby spinach leaf size, and keep the small ones in whole. I made a deliciously flavorful vinagirette with that beautiful meyer lemon, after caramelizing it, and massaged the dressing very well into the leaves and let it marinate for 15 minutes. Just like with kale it helps to start braking down the leaves, softens them for you to be easier to digest. I simply roasted the beets with rosemary in the oven, and pan roasted the radishes, adding celery salt to them. If you are vegan and you leave out the eggs, you can add fresh plant based cheese, or just simply nuts to the salad to make it a full, satisfying meal.

Instructions and  tips on how to make the components:

Roasted beets

Remove stalks, clean and dry beets. Place them in a roasting pan, drizzle with olive oil, add salt and rosemary sprigs. Cover with foil and bake at 430F until fork tender, don’t overcook. Cooking time will depend on the freshness, size of the beets. While the beets are roasting prepare the leaves. (see below)  Once beets are roasted, put some gloves on and now you can easily peel them. Finally cut them into bite sized cubes. Drizzle with some extra olive oil, salt, a little bit of the vinaigrette and set aside.

Pan roasted radish

If you haven’t tried roasted radish, it is time now! Their texture and taste changes so much when heat is introduced, they just simply turn into a different vegetable. It is better to roast them on the stove, in a pan, because they don’t require much time, and you need high temperature. Heat the pan very hot, add high heat oil (olive, grape seed) and add the radishes in whole. Season with celery salt and black pepper. Roast until you have a nice color on the radishes and they have softened. Cut the big ones in half lengthwise for plating.

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Vinaigrette

First get the zest of the the meyer lemon. Then cut it in half and place in the roasting pan with the radishes, cut side facing down in the pan. Leave them there, not moving until they are caramellized. Squeeze juice out of them and get rid of pits. For the vinaigrette measure the juice and mix it with 3 times as much grapeseed oil. Add minced garlic, maple syrup, salt, black pepper and cayenne pepper. Mix ingredients very well, just before adding to the leaves and beets.

Beet greens salad:

As I said earlier, wash them first, then remove leaves from stalk, get rid of any not healthy, wiltied bits. Chop the fresh ones into baby spinach size. You can also add spinach leaves to the salad, but treat them separately. Spinach will not need time to soak the vinaigrette. Chop the scallions and mix with all the leaves. Then add vinaigrette to leaves, massage them well, and let it sit for 15 minutes. During that time you can cook the eggs and prep the roasted beets.

Boiled eggs

 Place eggs in boiling water, reduce heat to low and cook for 12 minutes. Immediately transfer eggs in ice cold water, to help them cool and stop cooking.

To assemble the salad:

Plate beet or spinach leaves in a bowl, add chopped scallions, layer with the roasted beets and radishes, top with the eggs and finish off with arugula blossom and your choice of nuts. Of course you can leave out the arugula blossoms, I had some at home and I used them for a bit of spice in the salad. You can mix arugula leaves to the beet greens, too.

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Ingredients (serves 2) (list by components of salad, in case you want to leave something out)

  • 4 medium beets
  • olive oil, rosemary sprigs, salt
  • 10-14 breakfast radishes
  • oilve oil, celery salt
  • zest of 1 meyer lemon
  • juice of 1 roasted meyer lemon
  • olive oil
  • 1 tsp maple syrup
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper
  • 6 eggs
  • 4 scallions
  • arugula leaves or blossoms
  • for vegans: fresh plant based cheese or your choice or nut blend

Hope you enjoy the freshness of this salad and your body will definitely will thank you for all the nutrient dense produce!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cauliflower grits, chanterelle and the perfect sunny side up egg

This cauliflower grits was a result of necessity…. I had a cauliflower in the fridge that really needed to be used. And while I was making our brunch, on a Sunday morning, coming back from Hollywood Farmers market with fresh eggs, chanterelle, and pea shots, the idea came. When we cook cauliflower and blend it, it comes up with an amazing silky, creamy texture. And what is it that we do with grits? We cream it. With butter, cream, mascarpone, or anything else. Just cream it, right?

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So while the grits were cooking in simple vegetable stock, I quickly added the cauliflower in a small pot of milk and water, added aromatics, a small onion and a bay leaf. Once that cooked, and the grits was ready, blended the cauliflower in just enough cooking liquid to be able to process and added to the grits. Also remember grits require 1:4 ratio of polenta to liquid. You can reduce it a little bit here, because the cauliflower cream will losen it up. You can play with the texture when mixing everything all together, to your liking.

I am not really keen on standing at the stove and keeping an eye on grits for a long time. So this is a trick I came up with, and it did help me to reduce cooking time. I buy the coarse grits in bulk and blend them superfine in my blender. Do this only when you are not bothered about losing the grits texture, but you want lets’s say a quick brunch option. This fine polenta will cook much quicker.

For dairy free and vegan version:

My original recipe requires milk and I also added eggs to make it a full meal. If you are dairy free or vegan, leave out the eggs and cook the cauliflowers in stock with all the aromatics mentioned below. Once cauliflower is cooked, transfer into blender and blend it with home made, thick cashew milk/cream. When I made a vegan version I served it with radish sprouts and quick pickled radishes.

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Ingredients for non vegan version (serves 4)

  • 1/2 cup grits, or the finely processed cornmeal
  • 3-4 cup vegetable stock or water
  • 1/2 small cauliflower torn into florets (the orange one will give a beautiful color to your grits! go for it if you have them)
  • 1 cup whole milk and some water (enough to just cover the florets in the pot)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 small onion
  • salt and 3-4 black peppercorns
  • 2 cups small chanterelle or any other wild, strong mushroom (see below other dishes)
  • 2 sprigs of thyme
  • 1 tbsp chopped parsley and chive
  • 4 eggs
  • olive oil for frying eggs
  • pea shoots or other greens to serve the dish with (it will require something fresh, crunchy with a touch of acid)
  • lemon juice and olive oil for the greens

Instructions

  1. Add milk, water, bay leaf, peppercorn, salt, onion and cauliflower florets in a small pot. Bring to a boil and cook it covered on low heat until florets are cooked. Don’t overcook, all the cauliflower flavor and bits will disintegrate into your liquid…. and we are not using all the cooking liquid.
  2. Discard onion, bay leaf and peppercorns  when cauliflower is cooked.
  3. Transfer into blender and blend into creamy texture with just as much cooking liquid as necessary to process the blending!
  4. In the meantime toast grits on olive oil for a minute, while whisking add vegetable stock. Cook it under constant supervision, stirring frequently. Add just as much liquid so you end up with a thick, firmer grit texture, so the cauliflower can loosen it up.
  5. You can also pay with ratios of grits to cauliflower, depending on how much flavor of the veggie you would like in there.
  6. To finish the dish pan roast mushrooms on butter and olive oil mixture with adding a couple of thyme sprigs. When cooked, discard thyme, and add mix of parsley, chive and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Keep it warm.
  7. Fry eggs on olive oil. Heat olive oil and before it is too high, add eggs, turn down heat and fry slow to keep a nice look.
  8. Put the greens in a bowl and drizzle with a squeeze of lemon juice and some olive oil.

To serve:

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In a shallow deep bowl and cauliflower grits, making a dip in the middle for the egg. Put mushrooms and shoots or other greens around the egg, on top of the grits. ENJOY!

 

And if you like the flavor profiles, you can make other, bit fancier dishes based on the same concept. This is a pot de creme of cauliflower grits with pan roasted mixed wild mushroom with garlic and thyme, parmesan crisps and some spicy nasturtium oil and leaves.

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Jerusalem artichoke soup with goat brie and truffled mushroom sunchocke chip bites

Jerusalem artichokeaka sunchoke is not the most common root vegetable. It is a bumpy, fleshy root vegetable, surprisingly of the sunflower family plants. Its look resembles to ginger roots. Its underground, nutty, starch rich root is mostly used as potato in cooking although it has more distinct flavor.

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However it is a versatile vegetable with an amazing good amount of dietary fiber content. Can be eaten raw, boiled, sautéed, roasted, pureed, made into chips. Without a complete list, its best friends are garlic, cheese, lemon, olive oil, parsley, truffles, wine, thyme, tomatoes. If you are vegan the best nuts to combine it with cashew, hazelnut and walnut. You can leave the skin on, especially if you make chips, or if the dish is more rustic and color is not a problem.

This time I made a creamy soup and served it with goat cheese and truffled, sautéed wild mushrooms nestled in between sunchoke chips. It is great to serve them together, the creamy soup with the crunch of the chips and all the supporting flavors are really good. If it is too much work, you can make the soup and serve it with some mushroom and a goat brie toast. Also you can just make the chips with mushrooms and brie and serve them as hors devours.

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Sunchoke soup

Ingredients (yields 4-6)

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 small, fresh thyme branch
  • 2 pounds jerusalem artichoke cleaned, peeled, cubed
  • 1 big garlic clove, grated
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 3 cup of whole milk
  • 3-4 cup of vegetable stock or water
  • lemon juice to taste
  • salt, black pepper to taste
  • chopped parsley and chive for garnishing
  • optional : sautéed wild mushroom for garnishing (see instruction at the chip bites
  • optional: toast to serve it with the soup

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Instructions

  1. Melt butter with olive oil. Do not brown it!!!
  2. Add a thyme branch in whole, so you can remove it easily. Sauté for a minute.
  3. Add cubed sunchokes. Sweat the artichoke for a few minutes, constantly stirring, making sure it will not caramelize.
  4. Add smashed garlic and some salt.
  5. Add the white wine. Let the alcohol cook off for a few minutes.
  6. Add stock/water (what you prefer) and whole milk.
  7. Bring to a boil.
  8. I removed thyme at this point so it doesn’t leave a very pronounced flavor. You can leave it if you like the taste but make sure to remove BEFORE blending!
  9. Cover, reduce heat and cook for about 15 minutes in slow simmer.
  10. Check with a fork that the sunchokes are really soft.
  11. There might be a bit of curdling of the milk because of the acidity in the wine. Don’t worry about it.
  12. Transfer to blender. Blend it to a very creamy consistency. Be careful when blending hot soup! Use a towel to cover the middle part of the lid instead of that small plastic bit. This way you can continuously let the steam out.
  13. If you want the soup to have a really creamy, silky texture, you can strain it through a fine mash strainer.
  14. Taste and season with salt, ground black pepper and some lemon juice.

Goat brie and truffled mushroom, sunchoke chip bites

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Ingredients

  • 1-2 big sun chokes, sliced 2nd thinnest setting on mandoline (you will need 6 slices for each person, to serve them 3 bites)
  • 1/2 goat brie round, sliced
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 tbsp truffled butter (or if you have fresh truffles, go for it. In that case grate over the mushroom sauté when it is done!)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 pack of 8 oz any kinds of mushrooms, preferably mixed and wild, sliced
  • 1 tbsp fresh chopped parsley and tarragon

Instructions for the sautéed mushrooms

  1. Heat oil with butter.
  2. When it is foaming add mushrooms. Stir well, making sure that all the pieces get some of the butter.
  3. Sautee  on high heat for about 5 minutes, stirring at some points.
  4. Add salt and ground black pepper and sautee for another few minutes.
  5. When it is done add chopped fresh herbs and either serve immediately or cover with a lid if you need to wait a little bit.

Assembly

  1. Thinly slice (without peeling) the artichokes across their widest part using a mandoline and fry in batches until golden brown. Leave to drain on kitchen paper, season with salt and some black pepper.
  2. Place a piece of goat brie and some mushroom in between 2 slices of the chips.
  3. Serve them on a plate next to the soup.

ENJOY!

Sumac spiced goat cheese pasta with sweet corn and blistered tomatoes

So here we are. SUMMER. Almost. The produce at the market definitely has changed and the summer staples are slowly popping up. Lucky me. I decided to come up with a few summer eats for a contest, but I was surely not prepared to buy some imported, bland tomatoes or watermelon. Because for me these two are the dearest and their taste when in season and you buy local, can not be compared to their available counterparts in December….So I took the clue from the market, as usual, and came up with the ideas while strolling, making sure not buying anything and everything just because “oh I might need those….”

Summer at the market looks so much like the one in Hungary. Tomato, pepper, melon, watermelon, peach, apricot, plum, corn. So let’s see what we are going to cook shall we?

Who likes pasta? I am pretty sure all of us. But you might have gluten intolerance or you might be on a diet? Don’t worry. I personally don’t buy white flour pasta anymore. For me it is a health choice and we eat it rarely so I will always go for a whole grain type. They have an earthier flavor and definitely crunchier texture which is only good when it comes to pasta. You can also buy pasta that is made with rice flour, quinoa or seeds, the choice is endless today. But if you want to avoid the carbs fully you know what you have to do? Buy a few courgettes and make them into spaghetti with the clever help of a vegetable spiralizer.

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Creamy goat cheese pasta with sweet corn and blistered cherry tomatoes

The great thing with this pasta is that you can have it warm when ready and if you have some leftover, it is great as a cold pasta salad too.  This pasta has an unusual spice, sumac. Sumac berry bushes are native to the Middle East and the ground berries has a bright acidity. It is a great spice to use when you want some tartness without the lemon. I also used aleppo chili flakes which has the same geographic origin, but you can add any kinds/heat level chili flake or ground chili. You will only blister the tomatoes, do not cook them down. When you get to eating you can smash some of them on your plate, adding some juice to the sauce.

I will start with the instructions and if you need guidance on amounts, it will follow.

How To

  1. Get everything ready so you can start making the sauce while the pasta is cooking, so all components will be ready at the same time.
  2. Cook the corn and cut off the kernels.
  3. Chop the shallot, parsley and scallion and mince the garlic.
  4. Mix the chèvre, creme fraiche and buttermilk in a bowl and season well with salt, black pepper, sumac and chili flakes or cayenne pepper.
  5. Start cooking the sauce.
  6. Heat olive oil in a pan.
  7. When oil is hot add tomatoes.
  8. When they are blistered, add chopped shallot.
  9. Sautee a few minutes longer, stirring continously, not burning the onion.
  10. Add garlic, sauté for a few seconds and add the chèvre – creme fraiche mix and corn.
  11. Taste and season if needed. It should be a little bit tart, enough salt, and a bit of heat.
  12. Drain pasta and add it to the sauce thoroughly covering in the sauce.
  13. Plate with generous amount of chopped parsley and scallion.

 

DSC_5229Ingredients for 4 persons

  • your choice of pasta or courgette spirals
  • 1 shallot
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 4 T room temperature chèvre
  • 2 T creme fraiche
  • splash of buttermilk or cream, just enough to mix ingredients
  • salt, ground black pepper, sumac
  • 2 cups of cherry tomatoes, smaller the better and different varieties
  • 2 corn cobs
  • parsley and scallion

 

 

Market veggies on a whipped farmers cheese, feta cloud with boysenberry droplets

This is actually a veggies and dip recipe. The only difference how it is plated and a little bit of extra tip I am going to share with you that will elevate the dish to another level.

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When I get some tiny and really pretty vegetables I always feel it is a sin to ruin them with any kind of cooking. I can highly recommend you keep them as well and enjoy all the benefits of raw vegetable. Unless you have some digestion problem and you do need to blanch them. So these are the vegetables and edible flowers I used in this dish to create a plate that you first eat with your eyes and then you immerse in the freshness of vegetables and herbs.

 

You can add any kinds of vegetables to a crudites plate. Crudites is a French term and it  means raw sliced vegetables served with some kind of dip. I would suggest in this case definitely use radish, cucumber, cherry tomatoes and even california pepper. They are really good with this whipped dip. If you want to create a nice plate you need to cut and slice your vegetables into different shapes and thickness to give your dish a diverse look and texture. You can also serve it simply just cutting the vegetables into similar size and serve with a bowl of dip.

The vegetables, herbs, leaves on this plate

  • radish
  • carrot
  • cucumber
  • cherry tomatoe
  • salad brunett leaves
  • borage flower
  • tarragon flower
  • mixed micro greens

For the dip (not vegan)

In a deep bowl mix 2:1 portion of farmers cheese and really good quality strong sheep/goat feta cheese. Add 1-2 tablespoon of sour cream and with a fork mix it and try and whip it a little bit, giving it a fluffier texture which will work very well with the raw vegetables. Once it is done, season it with 1 clove minced garlicsalt, ground black pepper, ground caraway and hot Hungarian paprika f you like heat (or any other ground chili or paprika) Also add chopped chives, green onions and parsley and mix thoroughly.

To make your dip vegan the only thing you will have to do is to make a fermented cheese and that will replace the feta here. I made a fermented cheese using cashew and almonds and after fermenting in my kitchen cabinet for 2 days I let it age in the fridge for 5 days. Not longer because I didn’t want it to harden too much. This resulted in a stronger taste which made it more similar to a nice feta.

Ingredients and instructions for fermented, aged feta like cheese

  • 1/2 cup soaked cashews
  • 1/2 cup soaked almonds
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1 acidophilus capsule or replace the water with 2 tbsp rejuvelac

Mix all the ingredient in a blender. Place the mixture on a piece of cheesecloth and wrap tightly. Ferment in the kitchen cabinet for 2 days without opening the door.

After 2 days check if your cheese looks good and make sure there is no mold. It should have a nice crust and smell fermented.

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Put it in your fridge to age 3-5 days. Do not leave longer because aging not only changes the taste but also makes the cheese firmer. Here you will need a texture that can be spread.

After the aging take your cheese out from the fridge, put in a bowl and mix it well with

  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • 1/2 tablespoon nutritional yeast
  • ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon paprika, or 1/2 teaspoon hot paprika (or chili or cayenne pepper)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground or whole caraway seeds
  • 1 tablespoon mixed, chopped chives and parsley
  • 1-2 tablespoon almond milk to adjust texture to spreadable (use any vegan yogurt if you have it)

To plate the individual crudite plates place a spoonful of cheese spread on the plate, with the back of the spoon spread it slightly on the plate. Place any kinds of vegetables, micro herbs on top.

And this is the point where my extra tip comes in. I actually really like fruit with savory dishes and vegetables. So what I did here when I was ready to eat, I smashed a few boysenberries, added a few drops of lemon juice and just sprinkled it over the veggies. You can use blackberries or youngberries instead of the boysenberries.

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youngberries

The dip and the boysenberry was just a real match made in heaven.

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